Reacting and Meditation

“Women can change better’n a man,” Ma said soothingly. “Woman got all her life in her arms. Man got it all in his head.”

“Man, he lives in jerks – baby born an’ a man dies, an’ that’s a jerk – gets a farm and looses his farm, an’ that’s a jerk. Woman, its all one flow, like a stream, little eddies, little waterfalls, but the river, it goes right on. Woman looks at it like that.”

the-grapes-of-wrath-18That was Ma Joad from Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck.  I’ll never forget the ending of this great John Ford movie with the surviving family members driving off into the richly toned black and white sunrise in their old truck.  Beat up but still running because it had to, I would argue that truck symbolized their lives.

Goenkaji had great advice for we who live in our heads too. He said, in effect:

Whenever negativity arises in the mind, just observe it — recognize the physical sensations associated with the negative emotions, and face them. Accept them for what they are.

Do not focus on the object person or event associated with the negativity, or the negativity will multiply.  Observe the sensation, and let it go.

Mental impurities cause unhappiness. As soon as you start to observe a mental impurity, it begins to lose its strength and slowly withers away. Once all unhappiness is eradicated, all that’s left is happiness.

Paraphrased from the Art of Living, by S.N. Goenka.

Cause and Effect in Art and Life

dogwood-2-DSC_2873It occurred to me through my exchange with a teacher this week that kids who do printmaking will have the distinct advantage to learn, first-hand, the process of cause and effect which impacts not only art, but all aspects of our lives. Sometimes things happen within the studio you have no control over, or that you don’t notice before running it through the press, which can result in massive changes to the print. Sometimes for the better, sometimes otherwise. While we can’t always control all variables in artwork or in life, meditation teaches us it is how we react to those changes that is the important thing.

When a print comes out brilliantly, do we take credit for it, and allow our ego to get all puffed up? Do we view it as a blessing from the universe to bring a smile to our day and to others? More importantly, do we look closely to determine why it worked so well this time, so it can be repeated?

When a print comes out ugly do we get angry and tear it up immediately, or do we calmly try to analyze what went wrong? Are we able to learn something about the process by seeing how the outcome could have been controlled better? Do we try to use it in another project? Better yet, do we promise ourselves to keep trying to do better, accept the outcome, and then move up and away from the negative emotions associated with the outcome?

I was not sure if I wanted to post this to my photogravure printmaking blog or this one, but it wound up here as I found it to be more of a spiritual exchange than a technical one.

In Metta,
Jon Lybrook